LIVE Biennale: Praba Pillar's "The NO!!!Bot"

LIVE Biennale: Praba Pillar's "The NO!!!Bot"

"Performance art is unpredictable and ephemeral, which makes it entirely an experience and a kind of art that falls flat when reproduced on Instagram stories or social PR strategies. The truth is, entering the space for performance art is daring; it’s consensual to receiving, witnessing, and participating in an experience impossible to experience once more. The experience could be anything.

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Review: 1 Hour Photo

Review: 1 Hour Photo

“My years of writing school and traditional ideas about theatre come barging in; when is the performance going to start? When will the curtains draw and the acting begin? I soon realize that this isn’t a red velvet curtain masquerade. I’m not here to see a re-enactment, neither am I here to witness a reproduction of memories. I’m here to see how Tetsuro interprets, responds to, and shares [a] fascinating life... in real time.”

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Interview: Hera Lindsay Bird

Interview: Hera Lindsay Bird

"Some of the rushed quality in the work actually takes a long time to get right! It’s hard work to sound as stupid as I do. I’ve always liked imperfect poems, or poems that are intentionally inelegant and awkward in rhythm, because to me that’s more exciting than a beautiful thought succinctly expressed. If you refine something too much, I think it loses some of its naked horse death energy, which is what I love poetry for. That’s one of the reasons Emily Dickinson is so great, because there’s something uniquely off about her work. I also am interested in unfunny jokes that go on for too long, which is something I stole from Stewart Lee.

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Interview: Jordan Abel

Interview: Jordan Abel

I was drawn to the western for a few reasons. One: it’s a genre that very often seems to represent Indigenous peoples in problematic, stereotypical ways. Two: there are thousands of western novels that are now in the public domain, but it is also a genre that is still very much alive today. Three: many North Americans have a deep and troubling nostalgia for the genre (which is also often intertwined with a kind of romanticizing of colonization that could also been seen as a romanticizing of Indigenous genocide).

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Interview: Danny Ramadan

Interview: Danny Ramadan

I believe that my characters have a longing to a home they once had; an innocent, heartfelt home that meant the world to them, and that they idealized in their own imagination to the point that it’s impossible to be true. Syria is this ideal loving place that once existed before the world became harsh, and rather rude, to their borderline naïve view of life. By being together, they kept that impossible place alive inside of their collective narrative, and now that they’re facing the reality of their departure from one another; they’re clinging to the details of that memory they had.

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Review: Bombay Black

Review: Bombay Black

“Resonating throughout each character is the connecting theme that they are all victims of circumstance. Each character is driven by incidents which both haunt and inspire them. The complexity of their dynamics and dark intentions leave you conflicted about what you hope happens for the story’s resolution.” Catch Bombay Black, written by Anosh Irani and directed by Rohit Chokhani, at this year's Fringe Festival!

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Meet September's Featured Artist, Sandeep Johal

Meet September's Featured Artist, Sandeep Johal

Rest In Power has its roots in my first series about gender-based violence, When Honour Kills (2006), which was my response to a rash of honour killings in the lower mainland in the early to mid-2000s. It questioned this notion of honour that is so powerful families are willing to kill their daughters over it. And let’s be clear here, just daughters, never sons. The two women from that series, Jaswinder Sidhu and Amandeep Atwal, are also featured in Rest In Power.”

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