Review: How Star Wars Saved My Life

Review: How Star Wars Saved My Life

“Harrison was born in a cold, small town to a warm and loving family. They enrolled him in a local Catholic school, where he experienced years of sexual, physical, and emotional abuse... But one day, as if by chance, Harrison discovered Star Wars. Its allegorical fight between darkness and light, victimhood and resilience spoke to him on a critical level, and catalyzed his slow journey towards healing.”

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Meet November's Featured Artist, Janice Wu!

Meet November's Featured Artist, Janice Wu!

“I’m interested in how our current material reality will be monumentalized in the future, and how value can shift with time. I see that even behind the most trivial mundane objects there has been a thought process in their design: whether it be planned obsolescence, signs and symbols in branding, or the mechanics of how visual aesthetics play into our memories and associations. It all says an enormous amount about our human condition, our needs and desires.”

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1000 Parker: The Past is Present

1000 Parker: The Past is Present

“Like the decades of history that resulted in the building that is now 1000 Parker, it is the artist’s patience and instinct that results in the final work of art. However, art is never still; like the continued evolution of a city or an historic building, art is alive with process, and it doesn’t end with the artist: each viewer’s encounter adds another layer of creation.”

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Interview: Marisa Emma Smith and Nyla Carpentier

Interview: Marisa Emma Smith and Nyla Carpentier

Marisa Smith and Nyla Carpentier, co-directors of Alley Theatre's adaptation of Wolfram Lotz's The Ridiculous Darkness, chatted with SAD writer Ella Adkins prior to the opening of this collaborate and incisive production. “'This is a piece meant to probe with questions, and not the easy kind. Nyla says, 'There are times when we go into the absurd with this piece, and people may be very challenged by what they see, but the next moment they may be laughing their heads off.'”

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LIVE Biennale: Praba Pilar's "The NO!!!Bot"

LIVE Biennale: Praba Pilar's "The NO!!!Bot"

"Performance art is unpredictable and ephemeral, which makes it entirely an experience and a kind of art that falls flat when reproduced on Instagram stories or social PR strategies. The truth is, entering the space for performance art is daring; it’s consensual to receiving, witnessing, and participating in an experience impossible to experience once more. The experience could be anything.

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Review: 1 Hour Photo

Review: 1 Hour Photo

“My years of writing school and traditional ideas about theatre come barging in; when is the performance going to start? When will the curtains draw and the acting begin? I soon realize that this isn’t a red velvet curtain masquerade. I’m not here to see a re-enactment, neither am I here to witness a reproduction of memories. I’m here to see how Tetsuro interprets, responds to, and shares [a] fascinating life... in real time.”

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Interview: Hera Lindsay Bird

Interview: Hera Lindsay Bird

"Some of the rushed quality in the work actually takes a long time to get right! It’s hard work to sound as stupid as I do. I’ve always liked imperfect poems, or poems that are intentionally inelegant and awkward in rhythm, because to me that’s more exciting than a beautiful thought succinctly expressed. If you refine something too much, I think it loses some of its naked horse death energy, which is what I love poetry for. That’s one of the reasons Emily Dickinson is so great, because there’s something uniquely off about her work. I also am interested in unfunny jokes that go on for too long, which is something I stole from Stewart Lee.

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