In Conversation with Barbara Chirinos

In Conversation with Barbara Chirinos

Writer Paloma Pacheco speaks with the inimitable Barbara Chirinos, programmer of the Black History Month film series at Vancity Theatre, and touches on the vitality of film as story-telling medium and the importance of diverse experience in art. “What I try to do with all Black History events is to promote them in the broader community. It is very important for the black community to show up because we need to be reminded of what we’ve accomplished, to recognize all of the people that have made contributions, to see people who look like us and to be reminded: We are worthy, we are fantastic, and we contribute to society.”

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Review: Cuisine & Confessions

Review: Cuisine & Confessions

The final demonstration was a gleeful and downright genius romp through flour. Clad in black, several of the female contortionists danced and leapt through clouds of flour: every child’s dream. Cuisine & Confessions was an exquisite performance that called the audience to listen to their stomachs and in turn, connect with themselves and the people around them.

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Review: Norah Sadeva and Amy Nostbakken’s Mouthpiece

Review: Norah Sadeva and Amy Nostbakken’s Mouthpiece

I was not prepared for the intuitive, almost instinctual wash of familiarity as I watched Mouthpiece. Admittedly, I'm sometimes intimidated by contemporary theatre because I'm afraid I won't “get it”, but this show was so profoundly relatable because of it's unique use of sound, physicality, and artful allusions to overwhelmingly intricate themes. Never before have I wanted to stand up from my seat and yell, “Yes! That's exactly it! The feeling of being hot and itchy and hate-filled because you feel wrong in everything you're wearing - that's what it looks like!”

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Eating Matters by Kara-lee MacDonald

Eating Matters by Kara-lee MacDonald

The poem beginning “the hardest part is knowing,” reveals the shame of all educated feminists who remain victims of themselves: that struggle between the intellect knowing better and the body self-destructing at the hands of learned behaviors. She writes “at the end of the day / ––theory fails / to account for disjunction / between bodily urges and / rational thought.”

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Poem: First Time Right After

Poem: First Time Right After

If you attended our Secrets launch you may have indulged our call for confessions and left a secret or two behind for us to peruse. Some secrets appeared on our Instagram before we passed them on to Curtis AuCoin, who turned them into a poem. Here's the result, accompanied by images from AuCoin's series "What's Personal, What's Secret."

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In Conversation with Patrick Stark

In Conversation with Patrick Stark

“I learned that I have no control over what other people think.” Patrick shares of his takeaway. “What am I afraid of? What people will say about me or not like me, but is that any of my business?”

Patrick asks me if I’ve ever watched a variety show where contestants are put in booths full of bills of money flying around. I have. 

“That’s what my life feels like right now. I love jumping out of bed in the morning because I’m excited to work on so many things. My career is not work—it’s my art, and that’s one and the same.”

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In Conversation with Melanie Murray

In Conversation with Melanie Murray

"So began my search for Jean Armour. Over the next couple of years I read many biographies about Burns as well as his extensive collections of letters, poems, and songs, trying to piece together a picture of Jean from the fragments written about her. She emerged as a footnote in the life of the poet, a blurry image that wouldn’t come into focus, a stereotype of the devoted, long-suffering wife."

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Conflict Is Not Abuse: A Conversation with Sarah Schulman

Conflict Is Not Abuse: A Conversation with Sarah Schulman

"We also see a distorted concept of loyalty in intimate groups, in families, cliques and communities. For example, one person might break up with their girlfriend, and expect their friends to be mean to their girlfriend. But in fact that’s the opposite of loyalty—real friendship and real loyalty and love means helping people negotiate and helping people be self-critical. The problem now is that we have a very high bar that must be reached to be eligible for compassion."

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Sayulita: because it's time to get out of rainy Vancouver

Sayulita: because it's time to get out of rainy Vancouver

From the slightly still sand-crusted heads of three Vancouver ladies, here some Do's and Don'ts for a long weekend in Sayulita: 

DO secure a reasonably priced Casita (sleeps 3) with a home-made infinity pool which you use as a makeshift bathtub to rid your bits of sand after a sweaty day out and aboot.

DON'T allow your conservative American Casita-neighbours shame you out of an evening skinny-dipping just because they're already in the pool.

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Review: Things to Come

Review: Things to Come

“Things To Come is a film about so many things; how we survive the inevitable disappointments and catastrophes of a life; how we navigate the changing seasons of youth, middle age, old age; how we learn to sit with our loneliness; how art and ideas can propel us through it all. But it is, perhaps above all, an impeccable dialogue between two exceptional women—one, a young director distinctly claiming her place as one of the truly great filmmakers of our time, and the other, an actor delivering one of the best performances of an already impressive career.”

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