The Merry Spinster by Mallory Ortberg

The Merry Spinster by Mallory Ortberg

If you’re a lover of fairy tales with teeth, then look no further than Mallory Ortberg’s newest work The Merry Spinster, a collection of dark short stories adapted from her series “Children’s Stories Made Horrific”. Beloved for her daily literary wit on the cult-hit website The Toast, and bestselling author of Texts From Jane Eyre, Ortberg has curated a chilling and hilarious romp through eleven classic stories.

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Interview: Jordan Abel

Interview: Jordan Abel

I was drawn to the western for a few reasons. One: it’s a genre that very often seems to represent Indigenous peoples in problematic, stereotypical ways. Two: there are thousands of western novels that are now in the public domain, but it is also a genre that is still very much alive today. Three: many North Americans have a deep and troubling nostalgia for the genre (which is also often intertwined with a kind of romanticizing of colonization that could also been seen as a romanticizing of Indigenous genocide).

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Eating Matters by Kara-lee MacDonald

Eating Matters by Kara-lee MacDonald

The poem beginning “the hardest part is knowing,” reveals the shame of all educated feminists who remain victims of themselves: that struggle between the intellect knowing better and the body self-destructing at the hands of learned behaviors. She writes “at the end of the day / ––theory fails / to account for disjunction / between bodily urges and / rational thought.”

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In Conversation with Melanie Murray

In Conversation with Melanie Murray

"So began my search for Jean Armour. Over the next couple of years I read many biographies about Burns as well as his extensive collections of letters, poems, and songs, trying to piece together a picture of Jean from the fragments written about her. She emerged as a footnote in the life of the poet, a blurry image that wouldn’t come into focus, a stereotype of the devoted, long-suffering wife."

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Conflict Is Not Abuse: A Conversation with Sarah Schulman

Conflict Is Not Abuse: A Conversation with Sarah Schulman

"We also see a distorted concept of loyalty in intimate groups, in families, cliques and communities. For example, one person might break up with their girlfriend, and expect their friends to be mean to their girlfriend. But in fact that’s the opposite of loyalty—real friendship and real loyalty and love means helping people negotiate and helping people be self-critical. The problem now is that we have a very high bar that must be reached to be eligible for compassion."

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Profile: Pulpfiction Books

Profile: Pulpfiction Books

"We both had experiences where I’d go into a music store or a video store when I was younger and I was really excited about something. I’d bring it up to the counter and I’d be vibrating with excitement cause it was that cool and then I’d just get a ton of shade. We were like “I don’t wanna replicate that experience.” We wanna try to do something different and we try to be low-key."

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Interview: Arushi Raina on When Morning Comes

Interview: Arushi Raina on When Morning Comes

"Expertly researched and equally well written, When Morning Comes is the kind of story that will make you smile, make you think, and maybe even make you cry—very loudly and in public, if your timing half as bad as mine was. To find out more about the book and the incredible history that inspired it, I called Raina last week and asked her all about “closet writing,” South African teenagedom, and her upcoming book launch on on July 12, 2016."

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Interview: Curtis LeBlanc and Kate Fry of UBC's New Shoots

Interview: Curtis LeBlanc and Kate Fry of UBC's New Shoots

For the past 30 years, UBC has partnered with the Vancouver School Board in growing the New Shoots program. Each year, Masters of Fine Arts students in the Creative Writing Program at UBC become mentors to Vancouver School Board students and teach the craft of creative writing both in the classroom and after-school clubs. These wonderful pieces are then published in an annual anthology.

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Interview: Patrick Kyle

Patrick Kyle's most recent graphic Don’t Come in Here captures all of the strange, disorienting, and sometimes hallucinogenic realities of apartment living—realities we in Vancouver have come to know and love (or at least tolerate). We called up the artist to ask him all about Don’t Come in Here, old school printing techniques, and his upcoming event at Vancouver’s own Lucky’s Comics on May 19, 2016.

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