The Pianist: A Concert Catastrophe

The Pianist: A Concert Catastrophe

The Pianist: A Concert Catastrophe is a unique performance of physical theatre combined with a farcical comedy of errors that results in a mesmerising tale of one man’s journey to, at base, play the piano. Through mime and a Charlie-Chaplin-meets-Houdini set of fantastical flourishes and stunts, the old adage that 90 percent of communication is non-verbal has never rung truer. 

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Seattle Art Fair: Impressions

Seattle Art Fair: Impressions

From trash rocks and spray painted cardboard boxes to meticulous and pristine paintings and deeply dynamic photography, the Seattle Art Fair is full of works that will first infuriate and then soothe you. In the middle of its second year exhibition, the Seattle Art Fair has grown in size, style, and is undoubtedly going to make a serious impression on the North American art world. 

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Laura Piasta and #VMF at Burrard Arts Foundation

Laura Piasta and #VMF at Burrard Arts Foundation

On July 14th, Burrard Arts Foundation opened two new exhibitions, one featuring their spring artist in residence, Laura Piasta, and another housing the in-gallery component of the inaugural Vancouver Mural Festival. Piasta’s show, A Definite Volume But No Fixed State, is expertly curated within the gallery and give a the impression of an alien interior design. The ink works are mounted like paintings and layered with iridescent shimmer. The murals in miniature provide a snapshot of the styles of working Vancouver artists and represent a kind of contemporary Vancouver School of art. 

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Review: Lyle Chan's String Quartet at QAF

Review: Lyle Chan's String Quartet at QAF

"But underneath the larger story is a cast of humans who become as enduring, emotional, and intimate to the audience as beloved characters in a novel. We learn about two gay twin brothers who lost the support of their parents, who in song form become two violins in empath-esq conversation. We learn about Chan’s support of a close friend’s suicide, which in song becomes a long drawn out note that ends, followed by the sound of a ambulance."

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Review: Bard on the Beach—The Merry Wives of Windsor

Review: Bard on the Beach—The Merry Wives of Windsor

1960’s North America meets Elizabethan England in The Merry Wives of Windsor at Bard on the Beach. First mounted in 2012, the Shakespearean play is back in full swing: part theatre, part musical, The Merry Wives of Windsor has been touted as enjoyable for anyone, regardless of prior knowledge or fandom for the undying playwright.

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Review: Kelly Reichardt's Old Joy

Review: Kelly Reichardt's Old Joy

"Last month the Cinematheque put on an event dedicated to Kelly Reichardt’s movies, a director who, after I’d heard so many small bursts of praise, was starting to take on a mythic image in my mind. I knew her as the director who scouted 39 states before choosing the exact Walgreens parking lot she wanted for her scene, who trekked across the Oregon desert for a movie, who made big independent movies but slept on friends’ couches to live, an outsider who made movies about outsiders."

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Music/Art Waste: Red Gate Arts Society

Music/Art Waste: Red Gate Arts Society

First held in 1994, the Music, and Art Waste festival purports itself as a multi-venue, affordable and accessible stage for variations of different artistic mediums and expressions. Originally borne out of retaliation against the heavily commercialized and corporate-backed New Music West festival, Music and Art Waste provided a safe, non-profit, alternative space for music and art lovers of Vancouver. Predominantly volunteer run, this amalgamation of music, visual art, comedy, and local culture quickly expanded into an integral part of the Vancouver subculture scene. Twenty-two years later, Music and Art Waste has proved itself here to stay.

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Music/Art Waste Review: Opening Night at Fortune Sound Club

Music/Art Waste Review: Opening Night at Fortune Sound Club

Music/Art Waste has come and gone, leaving Vancouver sweaty and ready for next year's festival. Entirely volunteer run, the festival returns annually and repeatedly outdoes itself, no doubt with thanks to the incredible minds at the helm, but also Vancouver's vibrant and growing art and music scenes.

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Review: Agnès Varda at the Cinematheque

Review: Agnès Varda at the Cinematheque

Film writer Sarah Bakke takes to the Cinematheque and delights in six films by French director Agnès Varda, each more assured than the last. "I have since changed my take on what it means to be a woman inspired by art and beauty," says Bakke, "and I don’t think I’ll stick to the meandering nymphet as created by men in film." We're lookin' at you, Godard. 

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Review: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque at the Vogue Theatre

Review: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque at the Vogue Theatre

What disappointed me most is that the show didn’t live up to its promises of being alternative or subversive. I appreciated the diversity of body types and skin colour but aside from that the show lacked anything radical. Much of what took place happened in the name of subverting the status quo for laughs. 

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