Review: How Star Wars Saved My Life

Review: How Star Wars Saved My Life

“Harrison was born in a cold, small town to a warm and loving family. They enrolled him in a local Catholic school, where he experienced years of sexual, physical, and emotional abuse... But one day, as if by chance, Harrison discovered Star Wars. Its allegorical fight between darkness and light, victimhood and resilience spoke to him on a critical level, and catalyzed his slow journey towards healing.”

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Review: 1 Hour Photo

Review: 1 Hour Photo

“My years of writing school and traditional ideas about theatre come barging in; when is the performance going to start? When will the curtains draw and the acting begin? I soon realize that this isn’t a red velvet curtain masquerade. I’m not here to see a re-enactment, neither am I here to witness a reproduction of memories. I’m here to see how Tetsuro interprets, responds to, and shares [a] fascinating life... in real time.”

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Review: Bombay Black

Review: Bombay Black

“Resonating throughout each character is the connecting theme that they are all victims of circumstance. Each character is driven by incidents which both haunt and inspire them. The complexity of their dynamics and dark intentions leave you conflicted about what you hope happens for the story’s resolution.” Catch Bombay Black, written by Anosh Irani and directed by Rohit Chokhani, at this year's Fringe Festival!

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Review: This is Our Youth

Review: This is Our Youth

“Watching This is Our Youth is at times deeply frustrating. Privilege runs rampant and unchecked, leaving you wanting to interrupt and offer the characters the advice they so desperately need... And though the way they channel this fear and insecurity is aggravating at times, it would not be so if the audience weren’t invested, as the quality of this production allows them to be. It is perhaps the strongest indication of why Han Bridge describes the play as a 'horrifically accurate depiction of the millennial mentalities that defines our ‘politically-correct’ 2017 world.'”

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Review: Refuge

Review: Refuge

“Refuge does the important work of highlighting the uncertainty and suffering that comes with certain types of global circumstance and mobility. The piece was humorous and touching, entertaining in it's own right, but it also solicited from its audience a deeper empathy than perhaps many of us are comfortable getting in touch with. It is vulnerable to open oneself to the hardships that others cannot avoid, to become invested in outcomes over which we have little overall control—but it is worthwhile.”

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Review: The Refugee Hotel

Review: The Refugee Hotel

“There is trauma and pain, there are memories of imprisonment and unimaginable torture; but there is laughter and dancing, there is family and love. The characters cope in whichever ways they can. The Refugee Hotel is poignant, heavy with pain and history, but it is at many times expertly funny and captures the dark humour that resonates best in the hardest of times.

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