Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Awkward Hug

Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Awkward Hug

There is an oft-expressed coming-of-age narrative we are familiar with—something unequivocally quiet and clumsy, something that sports all the sentimentality, the angst and the usual gawky suspects. So when Cory Thibert launches into Awkward Hug with an anecdote on how he lost his virginity, one might feel inclined to settle into their expectations. However, it would be an injustice to Cory, Linnea Gwiazdaan and TJ Dawe to say this is just a coming of age story.

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Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Rocko and Nakota: Tales From the Land

Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Rocko and Nakota: Tales From the Land

In Rocko and Nakota: Tales From the Land, expert storyteller Josh Languedoc takes his audience on a journey into mental illness and the healing power of stories. This one--man show, in which Languedoc switches with remarkable remarkable prowess between multiple characters, explores young Nakota’s struggle to grapple with his demons, both internal and external. Rocko and Nakota gifts audiences with traditional and contemporary stories about resilience and becoming your own hero.

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Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Lip Service

Fringe Festival 2018 Review: Lip Service

Lip Service, the physical comedy by Natalie Tin Yin Gan and Ashley Whitehead, is wholly satisfying (pun and innuendo intended). From the more technical aspects, such as their marked choreography and synchronization, to the show's deserved focus: Vulvas, obviously. And more specifically, issues of service, of self-acceptance, of doing-it-all, and more.

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Fringe Festival 2018 Preview: Precious Little

Fringe Festival 2018 Preview: Precious Little

When our words are no longer useful, how do we experience our interactions? Can we communicate in a more visceral, bodily way? Is it possible  to be understood in a more spiritual, energetic sense, to go deeper in dialogue when we are stripped of our dependence on the word?

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Interview: Sasha Singer-Wilson on My Ocean

Interview: Sasha Singer-Wilson on My Ocean

Using the words ‘environment’ and ‘Vancouver’ in the same sentence can result in some agonizing eye-rolling, so what better way to initiate conversation than through humour. My Ocean is the latest theatre piece drawn up by playwright Sasha Singer-Wilson which stars Nadeem Phillip (Rumble Theatre’s Cock, Neworld’s Doost) as the play’s only lead; a twelve year old environmental activist named Lenny.

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